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Frequently Asked Questions


Basic Facts

What is Neighbourhood Policing?

What is new about Neighbourhood Policing?

Who are your partners?

What is a neighbourhood?

What is a neighbourhood team?

How do I find out who my neighbourhood officer is?

What is a Police Community Support Officer?

What will Neighbourhood Policing mean for me?

How can I find out what is happening in my area?

How do I find out what my local priorities are?

How do I get involved?

Is it just about perceptions?

How does it work on the ground?

How is Neighbourhood Policing different from normal police work?

 

Funding and Measures

Sorry no FAQs.

 

Signal Crimes

What is a signal crime?

What if the public identify high visibility patrols and zero tolerance as effective solutions for fear of crime?

What evidence is there for the signal crimes approach?

 

Partnership Working

Who within the pathfinder police areas are involved in the delivery of NRPP?

 

Context

How does Neighbourhood Policing fit with the Home Office Police Reform agenda?

Is it just another take on Neighbourhood Renewal?

What is the link to Problem Solving Policing?

How does this programme fit with the Citizen Focused Policing Programme?

Is there a link to policing priority areas?

 

Benefits and Outcomes

So what is the real benefit for the public if you haven't actually reduced crime in that area?

If a neighbourhood's crime statistics go up, but the people there feel safer after you have implemented a Neighbourhood strategy, will you regard this as a success?

 

Further Information

Where can I get more information?

 

Basic Facts

Question: What is Neighbourhood Policing? [top]

 

Question: What is new about Neighbourhood Policing? [top]

 

Question: Who are your partners? [top]

Answer: The Police Service will be working with those who deliver and are responsible for the services in your neighbourhood, including local authorities, other public bodies such as the Health Service, Social Services, the Fire Service and voluntary services. Those who provide the services in your area, for example those who clean your streets and parks, remove graffiti, install and maintain lighting will all work with us in order to deal with the issues that matter to you in your neighbourhood.

Question: What is a neighbourhood? [top]

Answer: Each police force is working to define the neighbourhoods in your area, and these may vary from force to force. A neighbourhood is usually a geographic area which is of a size that best serves the needs of the local communities. Neighbourhoods should be defined through consultation with partners and local people so that each neighbourhood reflects the people that live within it.

Question: What is a neighbourhood team? [top]

Answer: A neighbourhood team is a dedicated team which can be made up of police officers, police community support officers, community wardens, special constables, volunteers and partners, all working together in partnership with local people in your neighbourhood.

Question: How do I find out who my neighbourhood officer is? [top]

Answer: Your force will be publishing details of your neighbourhood officer and how to contact them. For details contact your local police station, visit your force website or use the links button to see all forces or go to www.police.uk

Question: What is a Police Community Support Officer? [top]

Answer: Police Community Support Officers are full-time officers with partial police powers who are focused on community safety and deterring anti-social behaviour.

Question: What will Neighbourhood Policing mean for me? [top]

Answer: Neighbourhood Policing will mean you will know who your neighbourhood officer is, and you will know how to contact him or her. You will be able to contribute to policing in your area by helping to establish the local priorities in your area. Through getting involved you will have an opportunity to play an active role in your community to improve your quality of life. Neighbourhood teams will be working closely with the residents in your area to improve your neighbourhood. The police will continue to provide emergency and 24 hour response; but the main focus of neighbourhood policing teams will be dealing with your problems and priorities.

Question: How can I find out what is happening in my area? [top]

Answer: Contact your local police or visit your force website to find out what is happening in your area.

Question: How do I find out what my local priorities are? [top]

Answer: Discussions will take place between the police, partners and local people in order to decide what the current priorities are in your area. These priorities will then form the basis for police and partner action in your area. You have the opportunity to help decide what the priorities are in your neighbourhood by getting involved. For details of your local priorities contact your local police station or visit your force website.

Question: How do I get involved? [top]

Answer: Neighbourhood policing is your opportunity to get actively involved in improving the quality of life in your neighbourhood. You can help decide what happens in your neighbourhood. There are various ways in which you can get involved in your area, and they will differ depending on where you live. You could become a volunteer, there are wide ranges of ways in which you can work as a volunteer, you can use the skills you already have, and you don't need to have any special skills or training, just the enthusiasm to help make a difference in your area. You could attend your local community meetings and tell police and partners what your concerns are. You could join or set up a Neighbourhood Watch scheme in your street, you could join your local community forum and engage with police and partners regularly. For details of how to get involved in your area contact your local police station or visit your force website.

Question: Is it just about perceptions? [top]

Answer: No, it is about very real fears. It is a recognition that local people are best placed to identify local needs and that we should be tackling these needs. Additionally, anti-social behaviour, for example, is not just about perceptions: it has increased in seriousness and volume over the last 10 years. We are also interested in how perceptions of security impact on behaviour and through that, the impact improved security can have on people's experiences and behaviours such as in the use of public amenities.

Question: How does it work on the ground? [top]

Answer: First of all a baseline assessment is completed to assess public perceptions about crime, disorder and sense of security. Then further data (e.g. focus groups, public meetings, interviews) is collected to identify the signal crimes and disorders in a particular community. Once these are identified, further work is done to determine core information about the problems and to involve local people in prioritising the issues. The police and partner agencies then draw up a 'control plan' to tackle the issues and put it into action. The interventions used will depend on the nature of the problems to be tackled. A review is then conducted to assess whether the action against the signal crimes and events identified has worked in changing public perceptions/sense of security. Learning from the USA suggests that there is a long time-lag between interventions and changes in public perceptions. For this reason an interim measure of success will be to monitor changes in the perceptions of local opinion formers.

Question: How is Neighbourhood Policing different from normal police work? [top]

Answer: We are focusing police and other agencies activity on crimes,disorders and quality of life issues that have been identified and prioritised by local communities rather than the police themselves.

Funding and Measures

Sorry no FAQs.

Signal Crimes

Question: What is a signal crime? [top]

Answer: A 'signal crime' is a crime, incident or disorder that when seen or experienced may trigger a member of the public to interpret it as a warning about their level of security. So much so that they may change their beliefs or behaviour as a result. These may have a negative disproportionate impact on the public's perception of security.

Question: What if the public identify high visibility patrols and zero tolerance as effective solutions for fear of crime? [top]

Answer: These are possible responses to problems. The NRP programme relies on the public identifying the issues that make them feel unsafe, and only once they have been prioritised should the appropriate responses be determined. Local people are encouraged to help design new responses to problems. After all, those closest to the problems are often best able to judge what will work.

Question: What evidence is there for the signal crimes approach? [top]

Answer: Surrey University have carried out research into signal crimes. Part of the NRPP trial was to continue this research in difference places around the country. This will expand the evidence base for the Neighbourhood Policing approach.

Partnership Working

Question: Who within the pathfinder police areas are involved in the delivery of NRPP? [top]

Answer: Key to delivering Neighbourhood Policing will be the members of the communities involved and in time they will form the core of a local neighbourhood team. Also, all pathfinder areas involved will have dedicated officers, plus partners working on implementing the Neighbourhood Policing approach.

Context

Question: How does Neighbourhood Policing fit with the Home Office Police Reform agenda? [top]

Answer: The Neighbourhood Policing Programme fits closely with the ideas set out in the Home Office consultation paper 'Policing: Building Safer Communities Together'. This paper seeks to take Police Reform further by moving towards 'policing through cooperation' which involves increasing community engagement, strengthening accountability arrangements (including strengthened accountability for delivering effective neighbourhood policing), improving operational effectiveness (which includes ensuring sufficient capability to combat crime at neighbourhood level) and modernising the police service.The paper specifically recognises the special needs of neighbourhood policing

Question: Is it just another take on Neighbourhood Renewal? [top]

Answer: There is a close connection between the aims of Neighbourhood policing and the wider neighbourhood renewal agenda, which make a linkage between poor housing, poor health, poor education, fewer job opportunities and high crime rates.

Question: What is the link to Problem Solving Policing? [top]

Answer: The problem-solving approach is an integral part of the Neighbourhood policing model, which aims to identify and deliver sustainable solutions in a resource-constrained environment through partnership working with other public services, voluntary organisations and local communities.

Question: How does this programme fit with the Citizen Focused Policing Programme? [top]

Answer: Citizen Focused Policing Programme aims to embed a greater citizen perspective into policing in order to increase the confidence and satisfaction of the public in the police and make policing more effective. The Neighbourhood Policing Programme will contribute to the development of measures that can be used in the Policing Performance Assessment Framework and assess the potential for signal crimes based reassurance policing to contribute to raising confidence and satisfaction in the police.

Question: Is there a link to policing priority areas? [top]

Answer: Policing Priority Areas (PPAs) are focused initiatives aimed at tackling high crime and anti-social behaviour, and promoting social cohesion. They have been established in closely defined areas characterised by high levels of crime and low levels of community confidence. The style of policing delivered in PPAs is closely aligned with reassurance policing, including techniques like environmental visual audit, an emphasis on local engagement and establishing effective partnership working. If successful, the programme will provide a formal operating model for future PPAs that can be integrated more readily with mainstream policing business.

Benefits and Outcomes

Question: So what is the real benefit for the public if you haven't actually reduced crime in that area? [top]

Answer: The public will see a visible improvement in their local area in line with their stated wishes. The public will have become involved with the police and local authority work in their area, as they will have driven the agenda.

Question: If a neighbourhood's crime statistics go up, but the people there feel safer after you have implemented a Neighbourhood strategy, will you regard this as a success? [top]

Answer: Over the short to medium term a rise in reporting rates for crime and disorder may actually be indicative of success, as we are looking into a new area of policing, not fully covered by reporting standards. If there is some positive action we can expect people to be more prepared to report.

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